Norwegian military button, pre 1844. Lion with arched halberd. Found in Øvre Vang, Hedmark. Diameter aprox. 20 mm


US Army uniform button, found in Stange, Hedmark. Diameter aprox. 23 mm. Manufacturer: Waterbury Button Co. Conn.  


Yet another equal-arm brooch found in Ringsaker, Hedmark. This one predates the other and is estimated to be Germanic Iron Age (Merovingian), ~570 - 800 AD. 

First and last photo is courtesy of Terje Roger Olsen @ http://www.digginghedmark.com/


Equal-arm brooch found in Ringsaker, Hedmark. It is found on a site that has strong ties to the scandinavian viking iron age, and the brooch is likely to be from that time. The last image shows an intact similar brooch found in the viking merchant city of Birka in present day Sweden. Fourth picture is courtesy of Terje Roger Olsen.


A possible medieval weight, found in Ringsaker, Hedmark. It weighs in at just above 9 grams, which corresponds perfectly with the medieval “ørtug”, which was implemented by Magnus VI “Law-mender” Håkonsson of Norway in 1270. The system was in use up until 1683.


Bag seal for cottonseed meal, found in Øvre Vang, Hedmark. 


Bag seal for what is likely to have been a bag of flour, from Malmö Stora Walsqvarn in Sweden. The mill was built in 1881-85, and from the spelling of the name we believe that the bag seal is likely to be from that period. The newspaper article, dated 1899, loudly proclaims their superiority in quality to the finest american flours. The photo of the mill is taken in 1904.


Various buttons found in Øvre Vang, Hedmark. Front and back. The top right button seems to be inlaid with bone or something similar.


A “modern day” silver coin drop, found in Tromsø. The dates range from 1913 to 1919.

A “modern day” silver coin drop, found in Tromsø. The dates range from 1913 to 1919.

Thomas Phosphate (fertilizer) bag seal, found in Øvre Vang, Hedmark. The article is from an advertisement in a norwegian newspaper “Asker & Bærums Budstikke”,1913. The fertilizer was in widespread use since the 1880s, and was a biproduct of bessemer steel production.